A Few Nagging Questions about The Crossing

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  • 13 Feb 2016 at 2:06 am #8145

    cantona
    Member

    There are a number of things that have been puzzling me about the final section of The Crossing. Apologies if some of these questions have been answered on previous posts

    Page 668: “He signed the horses through the Mexican customs at Berendo and folded the stamped entry papers into his saddlebag and gave the aduanero a silver dollar.” Why does Billy enter Mexico legally this time around? I mean it’s not as if he bothered any time before. Perhaps he has become more circumspect because of previous mistakes? But then this would not tally with an earlier remark made by, I think, Boyd on the irrelevancy of legal documents in parts of Mexico. I wondered if this is McCarthy’s way of acknowledging the tightening of borders due to America’s involvement in the Second World War?

    Page 661: “I been working for the Hashknives. There aint no Hashknives. Babbbit’s sold it.”
    I’m guessing that this is the name of a huge industrial cattle farm; but when I checked on-line “Hashknives” was sold to Babbitt’s in 1901. On page 663 reference is also made to “T Diamond”, another place of temporary employment for Billy just before his final return to Mexico; and on 699 and 700 there are a few negative remarks about Hearst’s farming concerns Mexico side. I’m hazarding a good guess here that all such referencing might well support the allegorization of certain kinds of capitalist organization (large scale cattle industries) displaced by newer forms (oil); but, nevertheless, I’d still like to know if the above are specific historical references or fictionalized versions of real institutions?

    Page 699: Billy asks: “Who was Socorro Rivera?” Yes, exactly, who was Socorro Rivera? Couldn’t find anything about him on the net.

    I would greatly appreciate your help here.


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    • This topic was modified 1 year, 11 months ago by  cantona.
    13 Feb 2016 at 7:55 am #8148

    Glass
    Member

    Jim,

    Socorro Rivera.

    I found a street and a school named after this person in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, so they must have had some prominence at one time. Not being a Spanish speaker is hindering my search. I have always enjoyed the seemingly infinite little mysteries such as Socorro Rivera that McCarthy has embedded in his works.

    I did a little daydreaming about this and my story involved driving into Ciudad Juarez to that school and, much like Billy in The Crossing, asking its principal, “Who was Socorro Rivera?”

    And then I woke up.


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    13 Feb 2016 at 8:45 pm #8150

    cantona
    Member

    Peter,

    Apropos of Soccorro Rivera:

    For some weird reason these lines from Dylan’s Brownsville Girl keep ringing in my head: “The only thing we know for sure about Henry Porter is that his name wasn’t Henry Porter.”

    I suppose another way of looking at the Rivera red herring -if that’s what it is – is that it’s very much in keeping with the Corrido myth/history blur haunting this final section.


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    • This reply was modified 1 year, 11 months ago by  cantona.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 11 months ago by  cantona.
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