Bob Dylan's Nobel Lecture on You Tube

This topic contains 10 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  cantona 2 months ago.

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  • 07 Jun 2017 at 11:50 am #9527

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    This was recorded a few days ago. It is glorious. Set aside a half hour or so.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Zf04vnVPfM&app=desktop

    Thanks to the wonderful Palmer Murphy for the heads up.


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    • This topic was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Rick Wallach.
    07 Jun 2017 at 1:51 pm #9528

    Richard L.
    Member

    His Nobel acceptance speed was splendid, but this is even better, especially for us Moby Dick/All Quiet On The Western Front/Blood Meridian fans.

    Truly remarkable and rather unexpectedly grand.


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    08 Jun 2017 at 4:44 am #9531

    cantona
    Member

    I found the whole thing spellbinding. Not just what was said, but how it was said. If you are a Dylan fan, it should only encourage a return to the works themselves ( and that’s what the man was hinting at throughout). I’m currently listening to Tempest again, the last album of self-penned songs. If you can somehow eschew the anodyne sentimentalism of Roll-on John and the phone-in symbolism of the Titanic song, ye will discover many glories – the take-no-prisoners ‘Pay in Blood,’ in particular. The song – for me, anyway – has become a musical analogue to those wonderful meditations on ‘All’s Quiet on the Western Front.’


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    08 Jun 2017 at 6:25 pm #9532

    JVH5
    Member

    That was amazingly great. Thanks for the link, Rick. For a lecture, it also makes an incredible song. The rhythm and cadence in the delivery is totally moving. And that’s just the musico-poetic element of the delivery! So much more, a superabundance. Worth obsessive re-listening. love how his last line paraphrases the first line in Homer.


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    09 Jun 2017 at 6:28 am #9533

    Richard L.
    Member

    His section on Buddy Holly was also especially good. Buddy Holly didn’t have Elvis’ looks, but he was a musical genius. He turned John Wayne’s line in The Searchers into a hit song and the line became an everyday expression.

    His last album or two added string arrangements to rock’n’roll songs, like ‘True Love Ways’ and “Raining In My Heart.” Lovely stuff. No telling where he’d be now, and likely is in a number of parallel worlds.

    The coin toss, which turned out to be more legendary than I thought, still resonates for me when I read NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN, and “Early In The Morning” is a recurring earworm.

    Well, you know a rolling stone
    don’t gather no moss
    but you cross your bridge
    when it’s time to cross
    Well, you broke my heart
    when you said goodbye.
    Now the milk is spilt, and you’re gonna cry.

    Don McLean opened up about his intended meanings in his 70s song, “American Pie,” saying it was mostly about Buddy Holly. The “this’ll be the day I die” repeated in the song belongs to John Wayne’s line transformed by Buddy Holly:

    That’ll be the day.


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    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Richard L..
    14 Jun 2017 at 5:18 pm #9619

    efscerbo
    Member

    Thought this was pretty great
    link


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    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  efscerbo.
    14 Jun 2017 at 7:18 pm #9622

    Glass
    Member

    Carla Jean Moss: What’s in the satchel?
    Llewelyn Moss: It’s full of money.
    Carla Jean Moss: That will be the day.


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    14 Jun 2017 at 9:23 pm #9624

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    efscerbo: the ugly truth is that lectures are made of other lectures.


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    14 Jun 2017 at 10:59 pm #9626

    cantona
    Member

    Yes, and it’s okay to call out your heroes. But, to tell the truth, I was only mildly irritated by this – in fact, half-expected that parts of the speech would be cobbled together from other sources. If Dylan was a McCarthy, an Eliot, or a Joyce, a thousand dissertations would be lauding him as a bricoleur. But he’s only a songwriter; therefore, a plagiarist. “Half-wracked prejudice leaped forth, “rip down all hate,” I screamed.”


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    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  cantona.
    17 Jun 2017 at 11:24 pm #9637

    Richard L.
    Member

    A phrase or two hardly matters.

    Ya’ll might enjoy Adam Bradley’s new book, THE POETRY OF POP. He says that Dylan deserved the Prize and points out that his lyrics have been interpreted differently by different scholars in the way of classic poetry. I’ve read a few of them, including the volume of Buddhist interpretations. Bradley is well read and he quotes many scholars and provides ample footnotes. I find myself going to youtube to check out the many examples he provides of recent poetic lyrics by artists I barely know.

    The book is mighty interesting.


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