EuropeJournal of American Studies Special Issue on McCarthy Now Available Online

This topic contains 15 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Candy Minx 3 weeks, 2 days ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 11 through 16 (of 16 total)
  • Author
    Posts Mark Topic Read  | 
  • 25 Dec 2017 at 2:24 pm #10037

    Richard L.
    Member

    And it seems, Jean-Baptiste Clamence is John the Baptist of the Cris, or Christ, or Cross. I remember posting my review of THE ROAD at Amazon, long the featured review there, and saying that some readers might see Ely as John the Baptist. The lost prophet on the road.


      Quote
    27 Dec 2017 at 8:04 am #10049

    Richard L.
    Member

    Re: The Penitent Judge

    Whoops, the post disappeared. Unreliable, just like reality.

    Anyway, I was going to point out that Jean-Baptist is also a shape-shifter, and while it is SUTTREE that THE FALL resonates with deja vu, the penitent Judge can sometimes be seen as God or Devil. As a human, he goes slumming like Suttree, but he passes thru an epiphany that allows him to see that his deeds of charity are actually self-aggrandizement.

    Interesting fellow, that Jean Baptiste Clamence. I was taken by that bridge scene that Ken pointed out too. The laughter coming from beneath the bridge.

    We need to see if Camus used actual places and people in his novel like McCarthy did in SUTTREE. I wonder if there’s an annotated THE FALL around.

    Crews, in BOOKS ARE MADE OUT OF BOOKS, cites evidence to say that McCarthy used the doctor in THE PLAGUE as the basis for the character of Johnny Western in WHALES AND MEN and quotes McCarthy there along the lines of SUTTREE, that he knows nothing except that all souls are one and all souls are lonely. I don’t have the book at hand for the exact quote, but it is interesting too.

    And why are all souls lonely? Because we have been split from our othersuttrees.


      Quote
    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by  Richard L..
    27 Dec 2017 at 12:09 pm #10051

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Good question, why are all souls lonely? They are lonely when they confuse the the perception of separateness from their otherSuttrees. The ego creates an illusion of separation. However not all souls are lonely. Only the souls that are locked into perceiving that they are separate. Those souls that experience that there is only one sentient being alive on earth are not always lonely. Or perhaps their potential loneliness is that others do not perceive the same. My experience is though through decades of interviews about perceptional-based personal narratives…is that persons who perceive themselves as part of one living sentient being while acknowledging that perception practically are not lonely. They tend to exhibit peace-of-mind not loneliness.


      Quote
    28 Dec 2017 at 8:56 am #10052

    Richard L.
    Member

    Whoa, I should have used a blockquote or those little marks that Cormac McCarthy says are unnecessary. That rhetorical question was not my own nor even meant to be Cormac McCarthy’s but rather that of Cormac McCarthy’s fictional character.

    Chirality is an interesting concept for literary criticism and for theorizing about the deep design of nature, like the spiral on the shell and the spiral on the shield in the movie, THE REVENANT, and I’ve even read a recent book called BLACKFOOT PHYSICS. Curiosities for sure, but I haven’t yet jumped the third or fourth curtains necessary to make such sweeping statements my own.

    Connections between Martin Gardner’s THE NEW AMBIDEXTROUS UNIVERSE and SUTTREE, now, that’s something I can discuss. I’ve also been looking at Albert Camus’s notebook for some sources of THE FALL and Martin Gardner’s marvelous autobiography for its gossipy stories of such people as Unamuno and Rudolf Carnap and Dali. And other interesting things.

    But since you mention it, I will say that I believe that the driving force behind the human state is not chirality but rather impermanence and nothingness. Free will exists because we do not know the future and meanwhile we have the opportunity to try to fill our nothingness up with the illusions of our choice, rather like Mark Twain’s blue jays.

    My own illusions of choice are love, civility, dancing, and reading. Pretty much in that order. But, please, let this be only an aside. Let’s not change the subject of this thread.


      Quote
    31 Dec 2017 at 8:57 am #10062

    Richard L.
    Member

    I think that this is worth reading, if you can hack it:

    We are two opium smokers each in his own cloud, seeing nothing outside, alone, never understanding each other we smoke, faces agonizing in a mirror, we are a frozen image to which time gives the illusion of movement, a snow crystal gliding over a ball of frost, the complexity of whose intertwinings no one can see, I am that drop of water condensed on the window of my living room, a rolling liquid pearl that knows nothing of the vapor that engendered it, nor of the atoms that still compose it but that, soon, will serve other molecules, other bodies, the clouds weighting heavy over Vienna tonight: over whose nape will this water stream, against what skin, on what pavement, toward what river, and this indistinct face on the glass is mine only for an instant, on of the millions of possible configurations of illusion–. . .

    And that’s just half of the first sentence. The rest of it is just as good, but I won’t bother to quote it. It brings in what we recognize as classic symbolism, we are water and like the many rivers in James Joyce’s ULYSSES, we flow to the sea. Riverrun. As in much of McCarthy, there are mirrors and reflections and illusions. And a doppelganger–or is that twining or charility–it works either way. We are drops of water flung up by the waves and become isolated, individual drops, alien and lonely here and long to merge again with our true identity, the one true ocean.

    What Candy said above fits with that.

    The next paragraph starts, “Existence is a painful reflection, an opium addict’s dream, a poem by Rumi sung by Shahram Nazeri…” The narrator very shortly discusses Julien Gracq’s THE OPPOSING SHORE and the politics of its publishing.

    My ears did their pink rabbit thing, because I had just posed Nassim Taleb’s rather brainy best book list Over in the WHAT I’M READING NOW cache, and he said that THE OPPOSING SHORE is his all time favorite book, of any year.

    http://favobooks.com/writers/124-Nassim-Taleb-favorite-novels-and-best-professional-books.html

    The opening of this book could have been written by Thomas Wolfe–the good Tom Wolfe–or Faulkner or even Cormac McCarthy. But it isn’t. It’s Mathias Enard’s new one, COMPASS, and I came to it because it appears on some of the better bests lists on the web, from guys and gals who read McCarthy and Faulkner and the old French intellectuals.

    I’ve only read the beginning so far, but I tingle a bit. I can remember when the new McCarthy novel would first come out, and the feeling is like this. What is it we’re looking for? To paraphrase the opening of BLOOD MERIDIAN, we look for patterns, holes in the heavens where the light falls. When we recognize those patterns we feel less lonely.


      Quote
    31 Dec 2017 at 4:27 pm #10064

    Candy Minx
    Member

    There is a risk when one changes their consciousness…or the choice of illusions…and yours are admirable Richard…I feel like in the Kekule Problem…McCarthy is writing in a manner that is off-putting to liberals and others who feel that science is only packaged in one format. McCarthy is so strongly mystical in the Kekule Problem…and then he has just lost patience with the naysayers. What is the gap? What is the gap? Is it a so-called mystical approach to consciousness? He seems to be hinting at that. We are raised according to one set of metaphors describing the nature of reality. When we grow up and become adults we either reject, adopt or choose a set of metaphors about the nature of reality. But it’s all metaphors. Any metaphor fails when it describes the universe as separate bits. There is no Richard, there is no Marc, there is no Candy, there is no Mike, there is no Rick there is no tree, there is no forum, there is no supper or bikes or dogs there is one swirling being…struggling with metaphors. And the metaphors between cultures and societies often differ with each culture believing in their own version as the most valid.

    “”All cultures are famously ethnocentric and fiercely loyal to their own interpretations of reality, not just we in the west. We tend to see ourselves here in the west not as being what we are just another culture! All of our economy all of our way of doing things is simply one constellation of traits that has come together to be an expression of who we are as a culture. We don’t tend to think of that but as an extricable wave of history…that all these other cultures of the world are quaint and colourful perhaps but somehow destined to fade away as if by some natural laws. ..and they are failed attempts at being modern…failed attempts at being us. And nothing could be further from the truth.” Wade Davis.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGOJJWVFIyY


      Quote
Viewing 6 posts - 11 through 16 (of 16 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Comments are closed.