Help finding passage

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Richard L. 5 months ago.

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  • 12 Jun 2017 at 3:02 pm #9573

    Hello all,

    Out of the countless reads of McCarthy’s ouvre, I am having trouble finding which book contains a passage spoken by a blind man that goes something like:

    “You think you can close your eyes and imagine the world of the blind alike dreamers think they can imagine the world of death.”

    Any help would be appreciated. I thought this character was of The Crossing, but the only blind character I can find is one at a dinner table, and I believe I remember the above passage being spoken to Billy along a road…

    Again, any help appreciated!


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    12 Jun 2017 at 7:26 pm #9575

    efscerbo
    Member

    Sounds maybe like the very end of Outer Dark? Dude talking to Culla along a road? Don’t have a copy on me to check, tho.


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    14 Jun 2017 at 7:21 am #9614

    patk1188
    Member

    I think you are referring to the part of The Crossing where Billy meets the blind veteran. I absolutely love that part.

    His tale is several pages long. He talks about meeting a stranger on the road and describing blindness to him, which I think is what you might be thinking of. From page 283:

    “He said that to close one’s eyes told nothing. Any more than sleeping told of death. He said that it was not a matter of illusion or no illusion. He spoke of the broad dryland barrial and the river and the road and the mountains beyond and the blue sky over them as entertainments to keep the world at bay, the true and ageless world. He said that the light of the world was in men’s eyes only for the world itself moved in eternal darkness and darkness was its true nature and true condition and that in this darkness it turned with perfect cohesion in all its parts but that there was naught there to see. He said that the world was sentient to its core and secret and black beyond men’s imagining and that its nature did not reside in what could be seen or not seen. He said that he could stare down the sun and what use was that?”


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    14 Jul 2017 at 2:55 pm #9706

    That’s it PatK. Thanks for the help! That really stood out to me on my first reading:

    “He said that to close one’s eyes told nothing. Any more than sleeping told of death.”

    Anyways, thanks again!


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    14 Jul 2017 at 11:06 pm #9707

    Richard L.
    Member

    Re: “He spoke of the broad dryland barrial and the river and the road and the mountains beyond and the blue sky over them as entertainments to keep the world at bay, the true and ageless world. He said that the light of the world was in men’s eyes only for the world itself moved in eternal darkness and darkness was its true nature and true condition and that in this darkness it turned with perfect cohesion in all its parts but that there was naught there to see. He said that the world was sentient to its core and secret and black beyond men’s imagining and that its nature did not reside in what could be seen or not seen.”

    That part of the McCarthy quote reminds me of one by Terry Pratchett. Paraphrasing from memory:

    Light thought it was fast, and it was. Nothing traveled faster point to point. But no matter how fast light traveled, the darkness had always gotten there first and was waiting for it.


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