Hey, hey what you listenin' to to-day?

This topic contains 17 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Ken 1 year, 9 months ago.

Viewing 18 posts - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • 24 May 2012 at 2:59 pm #1338

    Anonymous

    I’m having my mind blown by The Fugs. The Fugs Second album (1965) and It Crawled Into My Hand, Honest (1968) have made me very thankful for the internet lately. Thanks CIA and DARPA…er Al Gorn.

    How have I made it thirty some odd years into life without hearing these cats? I guess I’m a whole lot lazier than I thought.

    Other favorites lately include Wings Band on the Run. The riff on Let Me Roll It has inspired me to go back through their entire catalogue. Deeder-dee-dur dur durm.

    Also listening to my old Wipers CD’s a helluva lot lately after seeing the mighty Melvins in Austin last month. Dear three fold Brigid them Wipers rocked and inspired Melvins and a whole slew of lesser bands including that boring and predictable act Nirvonner. Well at last they had good taste.

    Also…

    Melvins – Bulls and the Bees
    OM – Pilgrimage
    Circle – Forest
    Rogers and Clarke
    Frank – Joe’s Garage
    Captain Beefheart and the Tragic Band – Unconditionally Guaranteed
    Black Merda – Black Merda
    Neil Young and Crazy Horse – Americana (as tracks leak out via Neil’s site)


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    24 May 2012 at 5:06 pm #1340

    Richard L.
    Member

    Sounds like some good stuff.

    Author and McCarthy scholar Brian Evanson has two books out that are creating a buzz among intellectuals here–garnering praise from Jonathan Lethem, George Saunders, Adrian McKinty, and other authors. Brilliantly bleak, so I have to be in the mood for him, but without doubt brilliant.

    I recommend IMMOBILITY, but I have not yet seen his collection of stories, WINDEYE, for which he provides a 22 song soundtrack at this link.

    I’m currently reading the smart new thriller by Leonard Rosen, ALL CRY CHAOS, which is about fractals applied to Global Markets seen against personal love and loss, duty and responsibility, retribution and forgiveness, and the mathematics of Henri Poincare, who was ahead of his time.

    It took a slow hundred pages for the author to set up the story on which the ideas play, but then the novel moves very fast. I’m not certain yet how he will tie all of this up, but I’m confident that he will. This reminds me of a David Mitchell novel, in a good way.

    In the background, I’ve had Philip Glass’s soundtrack to THE SECRET AGENT (the Joseph Conrad adaptation), the late John Barry’s soundtrack to THE IPCRESS FILE, and the Alberto Iglesias soundtrack to TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER, SPY.


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    24 May 2012 at 6:36 pm #1341

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Death Grips “The Money Store”
    Garbage “Not Your Kind Of People”
    Bruce Springsteen “Wrecking Ball”
    Sleigh Bells “Reign Of Terror”
    Spiritualized “Sweet Heart Sweet Light”
    Karen O “Stop The Virgens”
    Kindness “World You Need A Change Of Mind”
    Cloud Nothings “Attack On Memory”


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    24 May 2012 at 7:11 pm #1342

    Glass
    Member

    Seth, cool you mentioned Band on the Run. Love that song and a lot of the tunes on that album, which has a memorable cover. Been listening to a bunch of old Jefferson Airplane and Starship these days. Oh, and Neil Young. The Old Laughing Lady has been haunting me for weeks!

    Love this version:
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NqoU_8Qd7q8


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    25 May 2012 at 12:53 am #1344

    cantona
    Member

    Panda Bear – Person Pitch.
    Bob Dylan – Never Say Goodbye ( From Planet Waves).
    Jayhawks – Smile
    Sex Pistols – Anarchy in the UK; God Save the Queen. (Read to my horror that Queen Liz is now more popular than ever, in this her Golden Jubilee year.)
    The Pogues – Red Roses for Me. (Seems that accordian/banjo player James Fearnley has written a fine memoir of the band. Check out this interview: http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/audio/2012/may/18/music-weekly-podcast-pogues
    Fred Neil – Do You Ever Think of Me ( Compilation)


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    26 May 2012 at 3:31 pm #1350

    willey
    Member

    A boxset from Dust To Digital called …i listen to the wind that obliterates my traces. Title taken from a Par Lagerkvist poem.

    http://www.dust-digital.com/projects/wind/

    I can’t recommend it highly enough, along with just about everything Dust To Digital has put out, especially Goodbye, Babylon it’s set of old-timey religious music and gospel. The page for it features a quote from Neil Young, about how his old pal Bob gave it to him for a gift.


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    28 May 2012 at 12:03 am #1354

    Bunny McVane
    Member

    Pixies cover of Neil Young’s I’ve Been Waiting For You.
    Laura Gibson’s rendition of All the Pretty Horses (I’m always listening to that)
    Grizzly Bear feat. Feist: Service Bell
    Hank Williams: Lost Highway
    Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grapelli: Nuages
    Grizzly Bear: Marla
    Devendra Banhart: Now That I Know
    Tom Waits: Walk Away


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    29 May 2012 at 9:21 pm #1392

    Ken
    Member

    Listening to some recordings of Doc Watson, who died today, RIP.

    NY Times obituary.


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    30 May 2012 at 1:31 pm #1409

    willey
    Member

    Yes, RIP, Doc Watson.

    I’m sure glad the old folk wisdom says bad things only come in threes (Scruggs, Helm, Watson), but to be safe, let’s send the National Guard and a team of physicians over to Dr. Ralph Stanley’s house. Who here is closest to Clinch Mountain? We’re all counting on you.


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    30 May 2012 at 5:59 pm #1413

    Ken
    Member

    Ah, it was not noted here, but Doug Dillard died two weeks ago, RIP.

    NY Times obituary.


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    01 Jun 2012 at 8:21 am #1425

    Richard L.
    Member

    Re: Scruggs, Helm, and Watson

    Billy Bob Thornton’s book is a hoot. Lots of talk about musicians far and wide. He tells a story about John Ritter, then about their mutual manager calling him to tell him John Ritter had died. This right after hearing about the death of his buddy, Warren Zevon. He talks on the phone about it for hours with Dwight Yoakam. Then the next morning, Johnny Cash dies.

    “Warren Zevon, John Ritter, and Johnny Cash within, like, five days. I was friends with all those guys. Particularly Warren and John, but I knew Cash very well. It was a strange week.”

    Thornton talks about his friend, comedian Jim Varney: “Varney grew up working in a tobacco barn. He’s a descendant of the Hatfields and he and I tried to make the Hatfield and McCoy story for years. Nobody could quite get it.” Thornton then tells the story about the time Varney took him to a strip joint at two o’clock in the afternoon.

    I don’t know if you caught any of the Kevin Cosner/Bill Paxton mini-series on the history channel, but it is mildly entertaining. There are several nice scenes, and a lot of filler in-between. They filmed a part deal of it ten miles away from where I’m typing this, at the Abraham Lincoln Homestead Park. I knew about it at the time, and watching it now, I recognize some of the buildings. These hills aren’t nearly as high nor as steep as those in the locale where the history actually happened.

    Paxton is fine, but Cosner and some of the other actors are dead wrong. Cosner just cannot do any type of southern or hill accent that rings right with me. It’s like hearing Jude Law as Jack Burden in ALL THE KING’S MEN. Don’t get me wrong, I like Law and Cosner, but as southerners or westerners they ring completely false.

    Thornton complains about the same thing in his book, actors from the north all sounding like Foghorn Leghorn or something else that doesn’t exist in the South nor anywhere else except in cartoonish movies.

    Another damn thing about the Hatfields and McCoy miniseries. There wasn’t nearly enough comic relief. The movie could have used a Billy Bob Thornton, as, say, an over the top killer like he played in THE ICE HARVEST. The Coen Brothers, who have read their Shakespeare, would have done it better.

    Angelina Jolie, Thornton’s ex-wife and friend, wrote the introduction, lovingly, and there are bits by and about Kinky Friedman, Robert Duvall, Dwight Yoakam, Tom Epperson, Daniel Landis, ZZ Top, the Yardleys, and lots of other people. He talks about his family (his mother was a Faulkner), about growing up and becoming a band member. Lots of stuff about his movies. Lots of pictures.

    I posted elsewhere his bit about ALL THE PRETTY HORSES.


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    04 Jun 2012 at 10:40 am #1475

    Anonymous

    Glass: Oh, and Neil Young. The Old Laughing Lady has been haunting me for weeks!

    Indeed it is a haunting rendition. Since I posted last on this fine forum I learned that Mr. Neil Young and Crazy Horse will be performing in Austin in October as part of the typically lackluster – to my tastes anyway – Austin City Limits festival. Now, if only I could afford a $150 day pass for the Saturday which Neil and the Horse are headlining.
    My hope is that Neil and the Horse will launch a tour in support of Americana and hit Austin – or some other Texas city – again.
    I was lucky enough to see Mr. Young a couple years back. He was beyond excellent. Catching Neil Young and Crazy Horse has always been a dream of mine.

    Have any of you folks read Neil’s father Scott Young? Candy, I’m guessing you may have. If so, I would be interested in recommendations for an entry point into this man’s writing. Apparently he is much celebrated in Canada.

    Good stuff from all of ye “Fighting Cormackians” – or should I say – “Somewhat Relaxed These Days Cormackians”. Har har. I say the relaxation is a good thing. Too much friction in the world these days.

    Also, I am listening and thoroughly enjoying the new album by the sublime Dirty Three entitled Toward the Low Sun. This is beautiful stuff. I’ve recommended them to Rick a couple of times, don’t know if the Good Knight ever listened to them. I would wager their ethereal vibrations would be of significant interest to readers of McCarthy. Mr. Warren Ellis of the Dirty Three – as many here no doubt know – helped compose the ghostly score for The Proposition, the Morricone-ish Days of Heaven inspired score for Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford and the subdued soundtrack for The Road. I love this band. and heartily recommend them to anyone who will listen. Horse Stories and Ocean Songs are my favorite albums by them. There is also a now out of print EP called Lowlands which is beautiful to behold.

    ~Seth

    [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6byhkpCFvfs[/url]


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    04 Jun 2012 at 12:21 pm #1479

    willey
    Member

    I second the Dirty Three recommendation, and also add that their fine drummer has tapped the skins on a few Bill Callahan tours and records. Callahan warrants checking out, too. Here’s his Western song, “Drover.” Drover as artist and all that:

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/6177132/bill_callahan_drover/


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    04 Jun 2012 at 1:04 pm #1480

    Anonymous

    willey: I second the Dirty Three recommendation, and also add that their fine drummer has tapped the skins on a few Bill Callahan tours and records. Callahan warrants checking out, too. Here’s his Western song, “Drover.” Drover as artist and all that:

    Thanks for that link Willey. I did not realize Jim White had played drums for Callahan. I dig Drover. Cheers mate.


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    04 Jun 2012 at 6:00 pm #1484

    Glass
    Member

    Seth, terrific you get the chance to see Neil again, and Crazy Horse to boot. I love Neil and have since the mid-1970s. Probably listened to Decade more than any other album, besides maybe a few by the Dead. My concert experience with Neil was a decidedly mixed bag as he was then in his Shocking Pinks mode so we endured that for the first half of the show in Omaha in the early to mid-1980s (or maybe it was the late ’70s). But he was quickly forgiven when he came out for the second set, sat at the piano and launched into After the Goldrush, followed by about every perfect song he’d ever done. I get the chills just thinking about how great that was. Cheers!


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    15 Jun 2012 at 7:24 am #1573

    Anonymous

    Glass: But he was quickly forgiven when he came out for the second set, sat at the piano and launched into After the Goldrush, followed by about every perfect song he’d ever done. I get the chills just thinking about how great that was. Cheers!

    Glass,

    That sounds amazing. It seems telling that Neil was doing these sort of encores during the Shocking Pinks period. I guess he only felt like taking that joke so far when people had shelled out good money to see him. After the Goldrush is one of my favorites. I even love When You Dance, which my wife despises.

    Prospects of catching Neil and Crazy Horse in Austin at this festival are growing grimmer by the day. Those tickets just keep going up. Furthermore, I cannot abide 99% of the acts on the ACL event bill. They have Iggy and the Stooges playing second fiddle one night to a fellow called Jack White and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. This is mind boggling to me.
    Maybe in Tulsa…


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    04 Jul 2012 at 10:27 am #1681

    Anonymous

    Kevin Rutmanis’ of Cows/Melvins fame new band Hepa/Titus
    G-G-Good Stuff
    http://soundcloud.com/hepa-titus/sets/follow-me


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    14 Jul 2012 at 8:32 pm #1714

    Ken
    Member

    Woody Guthrie (as well as Northrop Frye) would have turned 100 today.


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