I Seem to Have Lost My Head Again

This topic contains 14 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Glass 4 years, 2 months ago.

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  • 29 Oct 2013 at 6:45 pm #4415

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Peter BODY HEAT is a movie that has held up… A classic noir. I think you should watch it again! Especially since it’s referenced in THE COUNSELOR.

    You know I think it wasn’t just Tichard who mentioned addiction… But I think I read a comment by Mike about ten days ago when he bought the published screenplay… How the counselor was am alcoholic or addicted…. And I hadn’t really thought of that.

    But that really does come together with that hellbound poem. Drinking was a strong part of the movie… The counselor had a drink in his hands quite a bit I seem to have feltp


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    29 Oct 2013 at 7:11 pm #4417

    Glass
    Member

    Candy, I think Mike may have noted that. Thanks for mentioning that. Relatedly, on the addiction theme, McCarthy used another line that’s straight out of Alcoholics Anonymous: We are only as sick as our secrets.

    He’s used AA sayings in other books.

    I’d love to see Body Heat again.


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    29 Oct 2013 at 8:00 pm #4418

    travis
    Member

    I’ve been thinking some more on TOM GRAY’S DREAM. The scene in which Westray references the poem takes place in a bar. I noticed, when we first see Westray in the movie, he’s standing directly below a horned animal skull. Possibly a mask. Of course, the horned skull foreshadows Westray’s fate. It also adds to Westray’s demonic presence.

    It’s at this moment in the movie where the counselor stands at a cross in the road. He must decide whether to make a deal with the devil or not. Reiner warned the counselor that this moment would come if he embarked upon this road. The devil even tells the him, “don’t do it,” but the counselor pays no heed to his advice and makes the deal. His life, as he knew it, is over at that point. I guess another way to look at it is, as Jefe later tells the counselor, he can never return to the world where his mistake was made.

    I wonder about the role of the Devil in TOM GRAY’S DREAM. He doesn’t appear to be a tempter. Quite the opposite, he’s a cautionary figure. Almost beneficent. It’s the fear of the Devil’s power that leads to Tom’s sobriety. Without fear, how many would walk the straight and narrow path?


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    30 Oct 2013 at 1:34 pm #4446

    travis
    Member

    Candy Minx: But that really does come together with that hellbound poem. Drinking was a strong part of the movieā€¦ The counselor had a drink in his hands quite a bit I seem to have feltp

    It’s very subtle, but the drinking is there. In almost every scene involving the counselor and/or Reiner, alcohol is present.

    The Devil and Tom Gray?

    The Devil and Tom Gray?


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    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by  travis.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by  travis.
    30 Oct 2013 at 2:25 pm #4458

    Glass
    Member

    Travis, that is a nice catch seeing that horned skull in that bar scene in the movie (While rewatching NCFOM, I always try to see what images are shown in the paintings on the walls). In that passage in the book with the Tom Gray reference, there are a couple of times it says that Westray is smiling, perhaps a faint echo of “the judge smiled.” Interesting take on Tom Gray’s Dream. I’ve been thinking or wondering if there might be some analogy with Suttree’s trolley ride on that bitter cold day, or perhaps even the caravan of carnival folk who come onto Ballard’s farm at the beginning of COG. At any rate, it’s fun stuff.


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