Is the Judge, Lord of War or the Antichrist?

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  eagleclaw76 1 year, 12 months ago.

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  • 01 Nov 2012 at 7:20 pm #2297

    eagleclaw76
    Member

    Talk about one hell of ride, Blood Meridan did not disappoint. Although many tangents are offered to the reader, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by this wily juggernaut.  The depth of his knowledge, his inquisitiveness, physical strength, gift of the gab and utter ruthlessness.Without the actual book in front of me the Judge says ‘War is the highest concern of man’,  ‘Before man existed, warfare waited for the ultimate practitioner’. Is  the Judge the Lord of War or the Antichrist?


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    01 Nov 2012 at 8:51 pm #2298

    cantona
    Member

    Nah, just someone with shares in Halliburton.


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    01 Nov 2012 at 10:03 pm #2299

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    Heh, or a former board member….

    but seriously, eagleclaw, he’s both. He shows many signs of being Shiva, the lord of destruction (and dancing) in Hindu mythology.  He also exhibits any number of attributes of Satan (fiddling, his enormous weight – in early Christian folklore Satan is said to have fallen and sunk into hell due to his mass) , and plenty of others you can probably list on a scroll.

     


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    03 Nov 2012 at 6:29 pm #2301

    Richard L.
    Member

    The Judge is Moby Dick, he is everything in this material world and he is nothing–the void, suggested by his weight as given in the novel on the blank page (his weight computed in pounds and correlated with the page number equals the only blank page in the novel, as Rick Wallach so shrewdly pointed out long ago).  Then of course there is the gnostic take, the Archon:

    http://www.metahistory.org/gnostique/archonfiles/AlienIntrusion.php

    Supported by the gnostic references in the novel.

    There are those who side with the Nietzsche (Mencken translation) interpretation of the Judge, as expounded by philosophy major and author Shane Schimpf in A READER’S GUIDE TO BLOOD MERIDIAN.

    Of course, what we believe is that the Judge is all of these and more, while uncannily suggested by the real Judge Holden in the cryptic memoirs of the very real General Samuel Chamberlain (who in turn is suggested by McCarthy as the veteran who escapes the gang–with the sobriquet, Chambers).

    In the ghostly almost ecoplastic and shape-shifting Judge Holden, fact melds with fiction which is welded by the spirituality that some readers see in the novel.  Want to see how?  The best thing you can do is to read John Sepich’s NOTES ON BLOOD MERIDIAN which is available at the bookshop on this site, along with a wealth of other Cormac McCarthy crit-lit.


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    04 Nov 2012 at 7:17 pm #2306

    eagleclaw76
    Member

    Thanks guys, I appreciate your thoughts. Sepich’s Notes on Blood Meridan should be helpful in  illuminating the unknowns.

     


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