James Franco's Child of God

This topic contains 30 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  Ken 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • 02 Apr 2012 at 3:24 pm #646

    Dowdy
    Member

    Have any of you been following the ‘behind the scenes’ videos from James Franco on the set of Child of God? I didn’t even know there were any (apart from one pre-production clip with Scott Haze that someone (possibly Glass) posted a while back. Here’s number 7, in the cave: Link

    Haven’t watched the others yet, just found this one in Scott Haze’s Twitter feed. Will give the others a watch now.


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    04 Apr 2012 at 1:53 pm #677

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Hey these are fantastci videos. I love Franco’s energy…he is so alive and obsessed. I love this whole making of videos…released during the filming!

    These are the heady new days and ways of making art.

    I think Franco is like a young Peter Joseph!!!! And I’d stand on Orson Wells coffee table and shout that to the world!


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    04 Apr 2012 at 2:03 pm #678

    Candy Minx
    Member

    I thought the fire troubles were hilarious. I could have told them it would smoke them out when I first saw the camp fire…I was thinking to myself…”uh oh”.

    And holy crap…Scott Haze is awesome!!!! He is freaking me out…


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    06 Apr 2012 at 11:47 pm #712

    Bunny McVane
    Member

    You been wantin’ it


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    07 Nov 2012 at 2:49 am #2310

    This will come out in 2013, right?


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    07 Nov 2012 at 12:49 pm #2314

    wesmorgan
    Member

    Just watched number 7.  I still have hopes for the film, but shooting the cave scenes in a mine seems a bit odd–as if they think that one couldn’t tell the difference between the two.  And the crew building a fire in the mine and nearly becoming overcome with smoke reminds me of a bunch of clueless kids like John Wesley, Boog, Johnny Romines and Warn Pulliam doing the same thing in The Orchard Keeper (pp. 140-142).  And these are professional filmmakers?


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    07 Nov 2012 at 7:08 pm #2316

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    Minx: in your cowboy boots?

    Email me your home address. I have something I need to send you.


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    09 Nov 2012 at 8:06 pm #2327

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Wes hello !!think this is a delightfully low (lower) budget version. I think the fire in the cave (mine) is more revealing these are city kids rather than revealing their status as film makers. Ha these days anyone can pick up a handy am and call themselves a film maker. Write a poem you’re a poet. Run for president you’re political.

     

    Rick! Hey hey! I will send you our address…it’s new. We are in the middle of a slow move…yep leaving grandmas and moving to Pilsen. We have a great cute apartment in Pilsen and the food on every street corner is amazing. I’m addicted to this torts shop with a breaded steak sandwich with pulled pork and ham, avacado, sour cream huge hot pickled peppers called “la seniorita” I have to have one once a week!


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    18 Apr 2013 at 12:36 pm #3287

    Dowdy
    Member

    Profile here of Scott Haze, including details of his preparation for the Child of God shoot and some photos. According to his Twitter account it sounds like the movie is on its way soon, although I was surprised to read today that Franco is bringing As I Lay Dying to Cannes while Child of God hasn’t appeared at any festival yet (and was shot before the Faulkner adaptation).


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    26 Apr 2013 at 6:24 pm #3347

    Fire in the cave smoking the flick folks out, except Scott Haze as Ballard stayed in there and gulped in the haze. They all kinda looked like smoked out dumb asses.

    Minx you moving to Pilsen? That’s in the Czech Republic, ain’t it?

    Ole Fart


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    03 May 2013 at 8:55 pm #3357

    Candy Minx
    Member

    I am living in Pilsen Bob. Pilsen Chicago…and it’s the best neighborhood in the city.i love it. yes it was at one point a Czech neighborhood but now it’s is diversified with tons of Hispanic population, hipsters, artists, families etc. it is great pastime of mine when I’m on the pink line to play a guessing game…identifying who gets off the train at 18th. The skinnier the jeans towards 18th. As one gets further from 18th the pants legs get wider and wider.


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    04 May 2013 at 8:09 am #3358

    Richard L.
    Member

    Re: “The skinnier the jeans towards 18th. As one gets further from 18th the pants legs get wider and wider.”

    Kinda like the bigger the flowers on the dress, the older the woman.

    But what we take for synchroncity or quirks of ethnicity is more accurately explained by salesmanship. Corporations seduced us into buying what they sell and convince us that it was our idea all along. Why are Americans fatter than they used to be? Not because we have become a nation of lazy dudes, moochers, and takers (who vote for the socialist Obama; another joke), for even as Rush Limbaugh propagates that idea, we need only look to his example to see the oxy-moron.


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    25 Jul 2013 at 8:43 am #3682

    Well, it looks like “Child of God” will be premiering in competition at the Venice Film Festival.


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    28 Aug 2013 at 2:57 pm #3867

    Here’s the initial teaser trailer to Franco’s “Child of God,” which premieres in a few days in Venice.

    http://thefilmstage.com/trailer/first-teaser-introduces-james-francos-cormac-mccarthy-adaptation-child-of-god

    It’s a poorly-assembled teaser, thus proving my theory correct that James Franco is the fecal equivalent of King Midas: everything he touches turns to shit.


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    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by  Stephen Davis.
    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by  Stephen Davis.
    28 Aug 2013 at 11:39 pm #3872

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    A little premature. Might just be a leaked or purloined bit of footage. This has been known to occur, no?

    Anyone hear anything about his As I Lay Dying yet?


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    31 Aug 2013 at 6:47 pm #3908

    Glass
    Member

    A review out of Venice, the first one I’ve seen. Granted it’s only one review, but fears might be realized that Franco’s COG is some pretty weak sauce: http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/venice-review-james-francos-cormac-mccarthy-adaptation-child-of-god-20130831

    A nice review from Variety: http://variety.com/2013/film/reviews/venice-film-review-child-of-god-1200594365/

    Scott Haze talks about COG, playing Lester Ballard: http://www.metro.us/newyork/entertainment/2013/09/05/child-of-god-star-scott-haze-gives-metro-his-first-ever-interview/


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    08 Sep 2013 at 2:04 pm #3943

    wesmorgan
    Member

    This doesn’t look like a rave review to me. Barry Hertz writes from the Toronto International Film Festival:

    “…. watching/enduring James Franco’s Child of God was like suddenly coming down with a case of stomach flu, with the only appropriate reactions being nausea and retching. Adapted from a Cormac McCarthy novel, the 100-minute film (which feels like 127 hours long) stars Scott Haze as a mumbling, profanity-prone mountain man who goes through bouts of violent paranoia and…um…necrophilia. It’s a violent, ugly film that earned the most mid-screening walk-outs I’ve ever seen during a TIFF presentation. While it’s admirable that Franco wants to constantly expand his areas of expertise, this project is more of a stain on his ever-expanding CV than anything else.”

    http://www2.macleans.ca/2013/09/07/tiff-2103-diary-day-two-from-dead-cheerleaders-to-a-lively-zac-efron/


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    12 Sep 2013 at 4:20 pm #3967

    Ken
    Member

    From Cormac McCarthy’s ‘Child Of God’ by James Franco:

    … When I finally got to talk to my favorite living writer, Cormac McCarthy,
    I said, “I am going to be asked why I wanted to make a movie about this subject, so I’m going to ask you why you wrote a book about this subject.”

    In a high, slow moving Southern drawl, he said, “Oh, I don’t know James, probably some dumbass reason [chuckle].”


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    13 Sep 2013 at 9:11 am #3968

    Richard L.
    Member

    Links come and links go. Here’s a more complete James Franco quote from the link:

    When I finally got to talk to my favorite living writer, Cormac McCarthy, I said, “I am going to be asked why I wanted to make a movie about this subject, so I’m going to ask you why you wrote a book about this subject.”

    In a high, slow moving Southern drawl, he said, “Oh, I don’t know James, probably some dumbass reason [chuckle].”

    I knew he was famous for not talking about his work, but I hate not getting answers. In art school, for better or worse, you learn to talk about your work, at least with other artists. “Well, I see it as a metaphor for, or an extreme example of isolation and someone who is pushed outside of civilized society. Lester just wants to connect, he wants to love and be loved, but he is incapable of being intimate with another (living) person because he’s a creep. But with dead bodies he gets to control both sides of the relationship. The fact that there is an actual body aids his imagination in the creation of another outside of himself. It all helps him believe that it is not just a solitary enterprise. He gets the best of both worlds: he gets to be in control of both sides of the relationship and he gets to trick himself into thinking that he is interacting with someone else.”

    “Oh, I don’t know, James. I just know that there are people like him all around us.”

    “Yeah.”

    I guess what McCarthy meant on the phone is that Lester is a manifestation of the recurrent violence that flows through McCarthy’s oeuvre. But recurrent violence, or the portrait of a killer isn’t the only thing I read in the book, and it isn’t the only thing I tried to do with the film. For me it was a way to use shocking material (presented in a considered way) in order to talk about the human condition. There are no actual images in our film that are any more disturbing that seeing a city decimated in Transformers, innocent people being run over by the Rock in Fast and Furious 6, or hundreds of people destroyed from afar by General Zod in Superman—what is disturbing about our film is the context. But I want that disturbance, because it enables me to talk about the universal theme of needing love in a fresh way. And as Ezra Pound said, “make it new.”

    A CHILD OF GOD follows THE ORCHARD KEEPER and OUTER DARK in a trilogy about the evolutionary fall of consciousness into animal man. CHILD OF GOD is McCarthy’s tale told of an idiot, full of sound and fury and signifying nothing–except for the compassion and the genuine humor of laughing at our own foibles instead of at someone else’s foibles, of recognizing ourselves in the Other.

    It is a challenge for the observer, and for the community of observers, to find not only empathy but compassion for the outsider, to find the God within us who watches every sparrow fall. It is what Christians often preach but seldom practice.


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    13 Sep 2013 at 10:28 am #3970

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Great find of quotes Richard (and Ken), thanks for posting them here.

    I think James Franco is right on in his reading of CHILD OF GOD…and I believe he has described the novel very well.

    I also agree with what you observe, most profoundly said, about compassion for others…and Others.


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    13 Sep 2013 at 12:42 pm #3979

    Candy Minx
    Member

    You know…I was thinking about Franco and him trying to get some kind of commitment from McCarthy and then McCarthy’s response…and I remembered a small interview I posted at the old forum a few years ago. It was from a Canandian literary magazine…and it might be one of the earlierst interviews with McCArthy. I tried to find it online again and it is no longer available. So I phoned the magazine this morning…and although they have many back issues for sale…the woman I spoke to had not even heard of this interview…so she was going to track it down for me.

    Then I realized…maybe just maybe I had posted it on my blog. And I had! Yay!

    so I phoned her back and got her email and sent the small interview to her via email.

    unfortuantely I neglected to post WHO had phoned McCarthy and got his comments!!!! I hope the woman I spoke to will be able to track that down for me.

    Anyways…here is the VERY short interview via phone in 1986. I’ve posted it before…and it was met with a fair bit of negativity ha ha although I don’t know why…maybe because McCarthy’s rather more significant interview was in a Canadian publication way before he got so famous and such…I wonder if James Franco has read this…I doubt it…perhaps I’ll try to send it to him…or perhaps he will stumble by here…

    <i>I reached McCarthy by phone in Texas and put it to him that perhaps the public found his tales a mite bleak. “Jolly tales,” he said, “are not what it is all about. My feeling is that all good literature is bleak. When a work gets a certain gloss on it with age, and the current reality of it is dulled, then we can say what has and what does not have the true tragic face. I’m guided by the sweep and grandeur of classical tragedy. Mine are the conditions common to people everywhere and finally the work has little to do with any personal aberration of the characters.”
    I suggested that perhaps one reason his work has not secured its deserved audience was that his characters were indeed cast adrift in some “unanimous dark of the world,” within a “lethal environment” which offered neither relief nor instruction, pre-wheel times, time without mercy, time presided over by the implacable face of Nothingness, with a will to survive, fortitude, as the only and last testament. Whereas today’s reader wanted events explained, lamented, accounted for: Lester is the way he is because he comes from a broken home, his parents whipped him, he had no shoes until he was ten years old.
    “I don’t doubt it,” McCarthy said. “Modern readers are a lot more familiar with Freud than with Sophocles.”
    I asked him how difficult he finds it to write these amazing novels. “I work on each for several years,” he said, “and am brought to the brink of innumerable suicides. I want, even for the worst of the characters, grace under pressure, some slinking nobility.”
    I asked him what he had been reading lately.
    “I’ve just finished Shakespeare and the Common Understanding,” he said. “And one of your guys, Michael On—? How do you say it?”
    “Datchie.”
    “That’s right. Ondaatje. Wonderful stuff.” </i>


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    • This reply was modified 7 months, 1 week ago by  Candy Minx.
    13 Sep 2013 at 12:54 pm #3981

    Candy Minx
    Member

    In 1987…Ondaatje only had one published novel…although it’s possible McCarthy could have been reading an ARC. So the published novel COMING THROUGH SLAUGHTER is one from 1976. And the next novel, published in 1987…is SKIN OF THE LION. So…it’s possible he could have been reading wither one…SKIN OF THE LION as ARC copy.

    and here is the Shakespeare book…

    http://www.amazon.com/Shakespeare-Common-Understanding-Norman-Rabkin/dp/002925650X


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    13 Sep 2013 at 2:52 pm #3984

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Oaky…I’m a little excited!

    I called up Brick Magazine and told them I had found some of the article that I had posted at my blog…and so the woman I spoke to…Liz…was able to track it down.

    It was written by Leon Rooke.

    http://www.leonrooke.com/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leon_Rooke

    The issue the article is in is one they do not have a lot of copies in archive. So it’s not for sale…yet…but Liz sent me a pdf of the whole thing. She said she figured I could have it for free seeing as I had tracked it down and alerted her to this gem they had in their archives.

    Wes Morgan…I feel like YOU today!


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    13 Sep 2013 at 2:54 pm #3985

    Candy Minx
    Member

    p.s. John Vanderheide…this article was published in Brick Magazine, which is published through Coach House Press…which should have some significance to you and your introduction to Blood Meridian!!!


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    15 Sep 2013 at 10:13 am #3990

    Candy, do you think you could post the full citation for the interview here? I’m working on a paper on Outer Dark and I’ve been looking for interviews where McCarthy would comment on the significance of the Greek tragedy to his oeuvre, so Rooke’s conversation would be of great use to me. Many thanks in advance.


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    15 Sep 2013 at 12:00 pm #3991

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Maciek Maslowski,

    I meant to come back and add the issue# etc thank you for pointing out I forgot…

    If you have an email available I can send you something you might enjoy reading.

    Meanwhile…

    It’s from…

    From Brick 27, Spring 1986, used by permission of the author.

    The citations in this essay are from:

    The Orchard Keeper, New York: Ecco Press, 1965
    Outer Dark, New York: Random House, 1968
    Suttree, New York: Random House, 1979
    Child of God, New York: Random House, 1973
    Blood Meridian, New York: Random House, 1985


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    15 Sep 2013 at 2:50 pm #3992

    Thank you so much! My e-mail address is maciej.m.maslowski@gmail.com. Thanks again, MM


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    25 Sep 2013 at 9:54 am #4048

    Pequod
    Member

    Here is a review by Gerard Raymond. The film played at the New York Film Festival.

    This thoughtful review leads me to believe the adaptation may well be a success. I’m hoping it will play at the Chicago Film Festival.


    • This reply was modified 6 months, 3 weeks ago by  Pequod.
    16 Oct 2013 at 4:56 pm #4158

    Ken
    Member

    Last week must have been “Cormac McCarthy Week” for Alexandra Alter at The Wall Street Journal. In addition to her article on The Counselor (as discussed on another thread), she also wrote this article about James Franco’s adaptation of Child Of God, which includes an interview with Franco which resembles an older interview linked above. Alter quotes another McCarthy scholar, here Steven Frye (Stacey Peebles in the “Counselor” article):

    “Child of God” is not a hard read. It’s got a nice clear narrative line, though you might have to use your dictionary now and then,” says McCarthy scholar Steven Frye, who edited “The Cambridge Companion to Cormac McCarthy.” “The problem with the adaptation of “Child of God” is simply the content. It’s going to be difficult to render a mass murdering necrophiliac.”

    The only thing that seems new (and it might not be; maybe I just forgot reading about it) is:

    Interviewer: What else did you talk to him [McCarthy] about?
    Franco: I’ve talked about Faulkner with him a bunch. He comes out of that tradition.

    Wonder what McCarthy said about Faulkner; we’ll never know.


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    21 Oct 2013 at 10:48 pm #4207

    Ken
    Member

    Rick Wallach 28 Aug 2013: Anyone hear anything about his As I Lay Dying yet?

    Looks like Franco’s As I Lay Dying will go directly to VOD/DVD, to be released November 5: Amazon, and is possibly available on iTunes beginning October 22.

    As yet, Franco’s Child Of God has no schedule for wide theatrical release… so who knows?


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    21 Jan 2014 at 11:17 am #4985

    Ken
    Member

    Newly released (yesterday) trailer for James Franco’s Child Of God.


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