JAMES FRANCO'S NOTES ON BLOOD MERIDIAN OR THE EVENING REDNESS IN THE WEST

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  • 22 May 2015 at 12:29 am #7120

    Peter Josyph
    Member

    http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/adapting-blood-meridian/page/2


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    • This topic was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by  Peter Josyph.
    • This topic was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by  Peter Josyph.
    22 May 2015 at 12:14 pm #7123

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    A house as purple as that prose would be banned in Coral Gables for permit violations. “We talk of 1933”?


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    22 May 2015 at 2:35 pm #7126

    Candy Minx
    Member

    lol


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    22 May 2015 at 3:40 pm #7127

    Peter Josyph
    Member

    Here’s Franco’s intro to that memo:

    http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/adapting-blood-meridian

    Clearly 1933 is a typo.


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    22 May 2015 at 3:47 pm #7128

    Ken
    Member

    And here’s the recently discovered ending to James Franco’s adaptation:

    And finally the sun comes up over the prairie. An unnamed man pokes a stick into the ground and lo it is in flames, like magic. Could this be related to the fires that fell from the sky in the beginning? That would be a unity of the novel, you know, the ending harkening the beginning, and all that jazz. Following him are lots of people and some of them might be looking for bones. Would these be bones of hunted down buffalo discarded after the meat has been stripped, or of men who got killed in the, you know, old wild wild west? Anyway, they walk like toy robots when the batteries run low. Are these people for real, or are they just being socially awkward scientists looking for cause and effect in everything? Could this be a foreshadow of: the fencing off of the west, or the construction of a transcontinental railroad, or the establishment of telephone poles, or the search for crude oil, or fracking? Who knows? But ambiguity is great for discussion of the novel’s (and my movie’s) literariness. The man and the people keep doing what they do, and they all move along, nothing here to see.


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    22 May 2015 at 4:29 pm #7129

    Peter Josyph
    Member

    DAN OZZI’s ideal cast for BLOOD MERIDIAN OR THE EVENING REDNESS IN THE WEST on film:

    http://www.wordandfilm.com/2012/09/casting-the-uncastable-adaptation-cormac-mccarthy-blood-meridian/


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    22 May 2015 at 4:32 pm #7130

    Peter Josyph
    Member

    DAN OZZI’s cast:

    The Kid: Kodi Smit-McPhee
    The novel’s main character, the kid, is meant to be in his mid-teens. “He is not big but he has big wrists, big hands … the eyes oddly innocent.” It’s a pointless exercise to try to cast him since any current age-appropriate actors will likely have kids of their own by the time the film sees the light of day. But were it filmed tomorrow, Kodi Smit-McPhee might be able to fill the role. He played the boy in the film adaption of McCarthy’s The Road and is now sixteen.

    Judge Holden: Liam Neeson
    The novel’s most iconic character, Judge Holden, is almost supernatural. Holden is described as being seven feet tall and hairless and has a penchant for violence. Although a few inches shy of seven feet, Liam Neeson is certainly imposing enough to play the terrifying yet pensive character.

    Benjamin Tobin: Bryan Cranston
    Who better to play an ex-priest who turns to a life of crime than Bryan Cranston? His Emmy-winning portrayal of the chemistry teacher-turned-meth-dealer, Walter White, in “Breaking Bad” makes him a perfect match for Tobin.

    John Joel Glanton: Brad Pitt
    Glanton leads a gang of scalphunters through the Western plains. Who else have we seen lead a band of men motivated by bounties for scalps? Ah yes, Brad Pitt in his unforgettable “Inglourious Basterds” role as “Nah-tzee scalp” hunter, Lt. Aldo Raine.

    Louis Toadvine: Sam Rockwell
    Toadvine is a role that requires grit. On a behavioral level, he’s a veteran outlaw and brawler. And physically, he’s got no ears and the letters “H.T.” branded on his forehead. Few in Hollywood have the grit to pull it off like Sam Rockwell.

    Captain White: Jeremy Renner
    Jeremy Renner could play an American soldier in any time period. You could send him into the year 3000 or back to 1850 and he’ll still fit in. He’s just got that soldier look about him.

    David Brown: Ben Foster
    Brown is a ruthless and unpredictable member of Glanton’s gang. In just about every movie he’s done, from “30 Days of Night” to “The Mechanic,” Ben Foster has played ruthless and unpredictable characters. And in “3:10 to Yuma,” he proved he can play the heck out of a badass Old West bandit.


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    23 May 2015 at 9:01 pm #7137

    Candy Minx
    Member

    I love the cast list. Especially Liam Neeson as the Judge. And Pitt as Glanton. And I know a lot of people are sick of James Franco…but he has a warm spot in my heart. I love how hard he works. I love how passionate he is about books and acting. I thought his adaption of Blood Meridian was okay…it has to start somewhere, these kinds of draughts are a form of translation.


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