James Joyce and Cormac McCarthy

This topic contains 13 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  JVH5 2 years, 3 months ago.

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  • 22 Oct 2015 at 3:15 pm #7804

    JVH5
    Member

    It is weird, especially given Stephen’s “agenbite of inwit” over the death of his mother.

    Did a quick google search, and apparently he made that comment to his son Giorgio, who pronounced C & P the greatest novel ever written. So an off-the-cuff remark made by a daddy annoyed his boy thought better of another? Later apparently Joyce praised Dostoevsky to Arthur Power as someone who created modern prose and said the Brothers K made a deep impression on him.

    Forgot to ask you in Memphis how Friendo is doing.


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    22 Oct 2015 at 4:44 pm #7805

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    Friendo is splendid. He’s now a five-button boy, having just shed a couple of weeks ago. You can actually hear his rattle now when you approach the terrarium. He’s pretty much lost the beautiful rust-red splotches between his gray-brown saddles and his ground color has matured from bright gunmetal blue to a light bluish gray typical of adults of his species. He’s well past the point at which I swore to myself that I’d take him out in the pine woods and release him but he’s kinda become one of the family by now – much more so than, say, either of my idiot brothers could have been. Even so, I suppose that some bright day next spring I will have to take him out and bid him hale and farewell among the clumping palmetto and silver buttonwoods.


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    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by  Rick Wallach.
    22 Oct 2015 at 7:26 pm #7808

    cantona
    Member

    Mike: “Joyce is not sentimental about the “past” as Dos is”

    I suspect that this was part of a skepticism with some of the more conservative thinking behind the Gaelic Revival. Joyce was not alone on this – check Sean O’Casey. A very unsentimental (lyrical though he often is about the struggles of people caught up in historical change) but politically thoughtful approach to Ireland’s past, can be found in Brian Friel’s plays, especially ‘Dancing at Lughnasa’ and ‘Translations. For a thoroughly irreverent and iconoclastic attack on a sentimentalized Irish past, see the above mentioned Martin McDonagh.

    Oh, and I agree with Rick about Joyce’s letters. This can be extended to other authors’ published correspondences. The nuggets are rarities, while the bulk is nothing to write home about. D’ya get it?


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    23 Oct 2015 at 1:02 pm #7814

    JVH5
    Member

    Thanks for the update Rick.

    >> I suspect that this was part of a skepticism with some of the more conservative thinking behind the Gaelic Revival. Joyce was not alone on this

    I think Joyce’s deathbed reading included Flann O’Brien’s At Swim-Two-Birds. Joyce thought O’Brien (a.k.a. Brian O’Nolan, a.k.a. Myles na Gopaleen, a.k.a. etc.) possessed a true comic spirit, and the ways that O’Brien used legendary figures like Finn MacCool, the Pooka Fergus MacPhellimey and King Sweeny or legendary tales like the cattle raid of Cooley show a likewise unsentimental and hilarious use of the past. Rather than expressing a nostalgia to return to some plenitudionous picture-perfect past, the novel undertakes tearing those figures from that past and jettisoning them into the present, defamiliarizing both past and present in one helluva swoop.


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