Judging A Book By It's Cover

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Candy Minx 4 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts Mark Topic Read  | 
  • 31 Mar 2017 at 7:56 am #8963

    Candy Minx
    Member

    I wondered if anyone has some favorite book cover designers and if they might want to share them here.

    I am guilty of buying a book purely because of it’s cover design. I actually first read McCarthy because I was attracted to the cover of BLOOD MERIDIAn and bought the book. Had no idea I was going down a rabbit hole…

    Here are a couple I really like…

    Peter Garceau

    http://www.garceaudesign.com

    Janet Hansen

    http://www.janet-hansen.com


      Quote
    11 Apr 2017 at 11:38 am #9073

    Richard L.
    Member

    If you cannot tell everything about a book by its cover, you can tell a great deal…For example, when Saul Bellow published Herzog, it was an immediate bestseller.

    I prepared a lecture on Bellow. I found that the guests all knew something about Bellow, and many of them bought copies of the novel in the lounge. No one, however,I discovered during the question-and-answer period following the lecture, had read the book.

    It was too hard to read, they complained, too baffling, and the words were too long. They had bought Herzog because it was a bestseller and it seemed like a good idea to bring a bestseller on vacation. Herzog, like Dr. Zhivago, was one of the most unread bestsellers of the 1960s. But I had read it, and because I could explain it, the audience was grateful because now they would never have to read it

    Later I discovered that the New York publishers, who also knew that practically no one who bought Herzog could read it all the way through, were equally baffled by its success. They then decided that Herzog sold well because of its light blue jacket (with the smudgy overlay of a darker blue blotch).

    This particular shade of blue became know in the trade as “Herzog blue.”

    For the next few years, almost every new novel coming out of New York had a blue dustjacket. Today, Herzog blue has found its regular niche. If you buy a new novel that has a Herzog blue dustjacket, you will get a story with little or no plot, about a miserable, middle-aged man who is embittered with his life.”

    —-a small excerpt of a long essay about modern dustjackets by esteemed novelist Charles Willeford, WRITING AND OTHER BLOOD SPORTS

    And if you’s like to see a dustjacket that is Cormac McCarthy dark, take a look at the first edition of Lisa Lutz’s THE PASSENGER. Link:

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Fi.lisalutz.com%2Fimages%2Fthe-passenger-lisa-lutz.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Flisalutz.com%2Fbooks%2Fthe-passenger%2F&docid=y4uPrRBGNORhhM&tbnid=pHUUKjO7prkkXM%3A&vet=10ahUKEwi7usCj65zTAhXC5YMKHUAJCFQQMwgeKAAwAA..i&w=500&h=758&bih=611&biw=1064&q=lisa%20lutz%20the%20passenger%20dustjacket&ved=0ahUKEwi7usCj65zTAhXC5YMKHUAJCFQQMwgeKAAwAA&iact=mrc&uact=8


      Quote
    11 Apr 2017 at 2:04 pm #9075

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Ha thats a wonderful account. Thanks Richard!


      Quote
    11 Apr 2017 at 2:06 pm #9076

    Candy Minx
    Member

    p.s. never even heard of the book btw….the only Herzog I know is one of my gods Werner!

    And I had no idea that no one had read Dr. Zhivago…I assumed it was as beloved as Gone With The Wind. Don’t tell me no one has read it either!?


      Quote
    11 Apr 2017 at 2:07 pm #9077

    Candy Minx
    Member

    On one of the Lutz book jackets…I would call that blue…teal.


      Quote
Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Comments are closed.