Little Robert

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  wesmorgan 1 year, 6 months ago.

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  • 18 Feb 2016 at 3:56 pm #8166

    wesmorgan
    Participant

    “He knew what would come to be that the fiddler Little Robert would kill Tarzan Quinn” (Suttree, p. 430).

    Eric Dawson writing in the Knoxville Mercury has presented a well researched two-part biographical article concerning “Little Robert” Van Winkle in which he discusses the impact of the murder of Knoxville police officer Tarzan Gwinn (Quinn) on “Little Robert’s” career.

    http://www.knoxmercury.com/2016/02/11/the-forgotten-career-of-country-music-journeyman-little-robert-van-winkle/

    http://www.knoxmercury.com/2016/02/18/shootout-on-scott-the-gunfight-that-haunted-little-robert-van-winkle/


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    18 Feb 2016 at 8:53 pm #8167

    Glass
    Member

    Super interesting. Loved the “I am gone” last-words quote! That sounded like something from a McCarthy novel. So good. Thanks, Wes.

    Added on further thought about the “am gone” quote attributed to Officer Tarzan Quinn before succumbing to gunshot wounds and how that phrase sounded to me like something McCarthy would use in a book.. I think “am gone” reminds me of a bit of unusual phrasing from one of the books (maybe from a Suttree fever dream passage?) in which there’s a line that ends with “is gone.” Does that ring a bell for anyone? I will try to find it this weekend if no one else chimes in with the source.

    Added, part 2: Well, I couldn’t wait until the weekend, so I went and found the aforementioned line I thought of after seeing the “I am gone” attributed to Tarzan Quinn shortly before he died. Unfortunately, it wasn’t quite how I had imagined it. At any rate, it comes from one of Sut’s sicky sick dreams near book’s end on p. 453, 23 pages after the quote Wes cited above on Suttree’s prophecy of Tarzan Quinn’s death. The line that reminded me of the “am gone” phrase attributed to the mortally wounded TQ is this: “…wheeled, drew a breath, and was gone.” (Suttree 453)

    Nevermind.


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    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by  Glass.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by  Glass.
    19 Feb 2016 at 2:11 am #8170

    robmcinroy
    Member

    The fool says “I am gone, sir” to Malvolio in Twelfth Night, near the end.


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    19 Feb 2016 at 7:21 am #8171

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Wow what a great article on Little Robert. And it is still a real life mystery by the sounds of it. The secret true account the fellow won’t say what “actually happened” and why. I also love that there is a wrongful claim on a songwriting credit. Seems to me that there is a lot to find out. I wonder if Don Foster could figure out who really wrote the song?


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    19 Feb 2016 at 3:56 pm #8173

    wesmorgan
    Participant

    For the sake balance I suppose one also ought to read a bit more about “Tarzan” Gwinn as well.

    http://www.odmp.org/officer/reflections/5868-patrol-officer-lester-woodrow-tarzan-gwinn

    Be sure to check-out the expanded “reflections” section.


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    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by  wesmorgan.
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