Movie–Screenplay Differences

This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Candy Minx 4 years, 1 month ago.

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  • 25 Oct 2013 at 8:23 am #4284

    wesmorgan
    Participant

    Let’s have a thread for recording the observed differences between the screenplay as published and the film as released. I think that there are many such differences. For example at the very beginning the bedroom scene dialog between LAURA and the COUNSELOR did not have subtitles as specified in the screenplay. And the “finger fuck” line among others was omitted.

    The funny and non-essential dialog in the small grocery store (pp. 25-27) between the WOMAN and YOUNG MAN did not make it into the film.

    Please add others.


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    25 Oct 2013 at 12:23 pm #4290

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Hey Wes, I thought about this odes for a thread too, great idea.

    I noticed something different with westrays dialogue but this morning I can’t remember what. Oops. You covered the subtitles missing. I actually liked the idea of the subtitles. Also in the script it begins with the bedroom… But in the movie it begins with the motorcycle racing on highways. Then we see the motorbike through the livers window ( I think? Or did I imagine that?) the camera entering their bedroom and over the bed.

    Sorry I can’t remember more than that right now


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    25 Oct 2013 at 3:23 pm #4302

    travis
    Member

    Quite a bit of dialogue was trimmed, even if the entire scene was not cut. Initially, I’ll mention only the scenes that were entirely eliminated.

    Mercifully, the scene between Malkina and Lee is not in the movie. I can’t begin to feign interest in techie talk.

    The woman whose phone the counselor borrows to call Laura is not kidnapped. At least we don’t see her kidnapped. (I imagine the DVD will include deleted scenes. Maybe even a “Director’s cut.”)

    Also, the scene in which the cheetahs walk into the backyard of a suburban middle class home didn’t make the cut.

    Those are three I can recall off the top of my head. I’m sure there are more.


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    25 Oct 2013 at 8:07 pm #4311

    travis
    Member

    Malkina and Laura discussing Laura’s dream over the phone is not in the movie (Can’t help with page numbers; I have the kindle version). I’ve seen Malkina saying “You should be careful what you wish for…” in one of the trailers, so obviously the scene was filmed.

    The long scene in which the counselor and Reiner discuss Peterson’s Portuguese cousin and his sexual encounter in a nightclub is not in the movie either.


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    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by  travis.
    31 Oct 2013 at 1:24 pm #4475

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Here is an article that highlights some differences between screenplay and movie….

    http://www.themillions.com/2013/10/no-country-for-greedy-men-cormac-mccarthy-screenwriter.html


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    31 Oct 2013 at 1:26 pm #4476

    Candy Minx
    Member

    In some ways this article also helps with differences and is about writing…

    http://www.policymic.com/mobile/articles/70599/what-cormac-mccarthy-just-doesn-t-get-about-entertainment


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    01 Nov 2013 at 11:52 pm #4510

    Marney
    Member

    “McCarthy and Pops fail to realize that the masses always win — they don’t care for philosophy or intellectualization, for better or worse. Fail them, and they will punish you.”

    And they will pay the price as Cormac promises: ” Nothing is crueller than a coward, and the slaughter to come is probably beyond our imagining. ”

    M : Should we think [emphasis mine] about ordering?

    (The Counselor, p. 184)

    On topic: one difference: the gold dental crown on tooth #5(?) in the movie but not found in the screen play. Miss Canine, as if we did not , or would not soon, discover her tastes.


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    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by  Marney.
    04 Nov 2013 at 8:09 pm #4531

    Candy Minx
    Member

    I’m not sure where to post the following but there is a note I’d like to make about Cameron dials make up. In film noir a precedence is set regarding the female eyes. In the novel of the maltese falcon brigit o shaunessys eyes have some special attention… Described as something like pale prayer book blue. She has some kind of quality about her eyes in the movie but I don’t remember exactly… I don’t think prayer book blue is used in the movie of the maltese falcon. In Chinatown Faye dunaway a character has a large get or broken pupil( I think). Jake fitted notes they have a flaw. Maybe in the movie maltese falcon the femme fat ale has two different colored eyes.

    Ridley scott pays special attention to this quirk of film noir in blade runner… Rachel (Sean young) has her eyes tested to determine if she is a replicant. The camera catches a mechanical flatness to her pupil.

    In the counselor Cameron Diaz has special attention drawn to her eyes by her eccentric make up. As if she had punctuation marks under her eyes. This detail in film noir signifies that the woman always had the upper hand of knowing / seeing… She usually knows exactly what the heis or con is in the mystery.

    If anyone thought Cameron Diaz clothes referencing cats was rover HHS top pay a visit to the maltese falcon… The femme fatal exegeses fox and mink and rabbi it he’ll she probably wears kittens she puts on so many dead animals.


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    18 Nov 2013 at 10:53 am #4628

    Christian09
    Member

    Also, in the screenplay Malkina is pregnant at the end. she wasn’t pregnant in the film.

    The Shootout scene was suppose to be without dialogue and the Mexican Cartel survivor kills the driver in the screenplay by driving while shooting at him. Plus, he uses a pistol at first then switches to the automatic.


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    20 Nov 2013 at 7:00 am #4653

    Richard L.
    Member

    Nice bit aboout the femme fatale in the Maltese Falcon, Candy. I thought I had read all the crit-lit on the book/film, but I don’t recall anyone ever pointing that out before.

    As a symbolic earth mother, Malkina should always be pregnant or trying to get pregnant, even when her attempts are impulsively fetish-directed and ill-advised, as is the mother in THE ROAD’s sad affair with the ancient arrowhead just an atom’s thick, meant to connote the atom bomb in symbol but, man, what a stretch.

    Malkina is a svelt Rinthy from OUTER DARK, Faulkner’s barefooted Lena in spiked heels, heavy in June, light in August. Like them, Malkina is on automatic pilot, more modern but just as mindless in her predictable yielding to the animalistic Will.


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