The Cretin

This topic contains 52 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Candy Minx 5 years, 8 months ago.

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  • 11 May 2012 at 3:00 pm #1184

    Glass
    Member

    Peter: The “edit” button disappears, but fear not as you can go to the top of this page we are on now and click “new” and you should see “Topic” and “Reply”; click on either of those and it will take you to a page where you will need to look to the far left and there you need to click on the third icon down from the top (the icon directly under what looks like a bee). All of your posts/replies should show up. Find the reply you want to edit and click on “edit.” When you are done editing, look to the far right of the page and click on “Update” and your newly edited post should show up on the thread. That’s how I do it. Maybe there is an easier way.


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    12 May 2012 at 2:18 pm #1201

    Peter,

    I went to the top but didn’t see any “new” to click on. Did I miss something?


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    12 May 2012 at 5:50 pm #1202

    Glass
    Member

    Bob, I’m viewing this on a tablet so maybe the “New” thing to click on doesn’t show up on the PC version of the site. Sorry I couldn’t help direct you to your posts, which I’ve been enjoying a lot along with the comments from everyone else.

    Checking over this amazing part of the book to follow along with the conversation has opened up a few new areas of consideration, the most interesting to me being how McCarthy uses the word “turn” as in “turned them out” and “turned a deaf ear,” and so on. Leads to some fun thought experiments, allusiveness, suggestiveness, etc.


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    13 May 2012 at 11:53 am #1210

    leedriver
    Member

    The judge is unassailable is the problem. I mean, you can assail him if you want but you will loose, whether in argument or in a fight. Even if you bushwhacked him from ambush and burned the body and scattered the ashes you still wouldn’t feel safe. Nor would you be. Any and all assemblages resembling Glanton and the gang, which are relatively infrequent in history to be sure, will draw judge manifestations of varying degrees of power and clarity to it, like flies to shit. The Hitler cabal is a reasonable example, but don’t go thinking Hitler is a manifestation the judge for he’s not, not even close. Hitler is a mere Glanton. But Goering now, is eerily close, attached to Hitler like a lamprey, a lamprey albeit with powers and axes of his own. It’s a natural occurrence for spark to come from flint striking steel, but without tinder there is no fire. Glanton and the men are incendiary tinder, like thermite, the judge is spark. It was Glanton and the men with their actions already, that conjured the judge and not the other way around. The judge was called like a Djinn by the assembly and potential of Glanton and the men. I hate when that happens.

    We could say the judge is lying when he tells to the mob about Reverend Green, but we only know he lies because he himself tells us so, and who’s to say he’s not lying here, or here. One thing we know for sure is, whether he lies or not, we humans have predispositions in us to believe him in nearly every case. It’s far easier and more exciting somehow to believe a preacher would abuse his flock, than that somebody, a stranger from out of the crowd, would falsely and with force and artful precision, have the balls to accuse him of such. The tinder’s just laying there to fall into the right hands or, the wrong hands.

    If the man and the boy from The Road had come upon Glanton and the judge and the gang and actually had an encounter, the man would have to die immediately for he and the judge cannot exist in the same frame not even for a second. What would then happen to the child we will never know but certainly can imagine. It’s hard however, to imagine boy going among the gang members talking about carrying the fire or finding the good guys, and finding among them, a friend. Neither could the judge brook a Boyd Parham, or a Billy either. Individual thinkers as such would need to be quickly plucked for the gang to maintain purity.

    All of which is to suggest that BM is not an exposition of philosophy but rather an example what can happen with no moral compass, where no character can maintain anything resembling a “true north,” other than ta dah, de judge, who by the way as part of his resume’, resents that birds can fly without his say so.

    The persistence however, of the notion that war among humans is historically inevitable, inlaid in our nature, and thinking otherwise is vacuous, remains troubling.

    If the judge were to go on the show Survivor, to outwit, outplay, and outlast, he would most certainly win, unless Casteneda’s Don Genaro could be found and convinced to sign on. Talk about a battle of the titans!

    Einstein said “A man’s ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education and social ties; no religious basis is necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death.”

    Not that Einstein is always right, but I’m down with that. Ethics are obvious and immutable, existing the same in all cultures for all time to anyone with the eye to see, and one need not check with a philosopher to know or verify that, although surely they can if they doubt their own sense but at that point it’s already too late for them, they don’t believe in their own compass and will need to be lied to and tricked and cajoled into seeing their own heart once again, or just mulched.


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    13 May 2012 at 12:44 pm #1211

    How do we start a new thread in this new Forum? It’s harder for me to navigate than the old one.


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    13 May 2012 at 10:49 pm #1219

    Glass
    Member

    Lee, terrific post. I like your use of assemblages in your commentary on the gang, and that image of the judge’s ashes being scattered is a stand out.

    I’d been thinking along similar lines in that I’ve been imagining the gang as analogous to Santiago’s big fish in Old Man and the Sea, leaving a trail of blood and winding up a skeleton on the beach at journey’s end. You said the assemblage of the gang brought the judge, much like the marlin brought the sharks in Hemingway’s story. And the fish is badly used up, as Rick said of something in McCarthy a long time ago, and tethered to the old man much like the gang seems to be tethered to the judge.

    To me there is a kenotic element at work in the sense that each entity becomes nothing with a twist that rather than taking on flesh like in the story of Jesus, the fish and the gang are, for lack of a better word, de-fleshed.

    Loved your post.


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    14 May 2012 at 9:21 am #1233

    peterfranz
    Member

    Thanks, Peter.

    Bob, it does work. The buttons are at the very top of the page in a narrow grey bar. Look really hard!

    pf


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    14 May 2012 at 12:04 pm #1239

    Done got it. Thanks, two Peters. Now if there were just an easier way to italicize for this here place without dealing with those weird little HTML marks. Can’t get em right to save me. And what does 512 KB’s mean in terms of page length? Don’t guess I coulda posted my recent essay on The Road here w/o breaking it up in various posts. Right? A question to Marty or any of you high techies out there.


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    14 May 2012 at 12:06 pm #1240

    I don’t get half the tags below. Yeah, I know. I’m a technical dumbass.


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    17 May 2012 at 9:29 am #1278

    The gang conjures up the judge? Oh, hell no! Years ago, Martin Zook or somebody and I slugged out this matter to the screaming-at-each-other point. I believe it was Dave Cremean that conceded that I had the better argument based on what the text actually says about the judge thrown off the stage coach, then sitting on a rock and the gang on their last leg too wasted even to piss in their boots. If anything the judge regenerates the gang but as much literally as symbolically.


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