"The Crossing" Based on the world of Cormac McCarthy

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  • 12 Jul 2014 at 2:30 pm #5628

    JoeTaylor
    Member

    Here is link to the trailer for my new revisionist western, “The Crossing.”

    https://vimeo.com/100263853

    The Crossing is a tale of desertion, betrayal and retribution set in a post-Civil War American West.

    In the brutal wilds of the Sonoran desert, SAMUEL CHAMBERS is a desperately wounded man stranded in enemy territory and pursued by revenge driven ELI TREATCHER, a vicious, psychopathic madman who Samuel recently rode with during his days with the Glanton gang of government sponsored scalp hunters.

    After evading a war party Yuma Indians, Samuel is soon apprehended by Treatcher, under the pretense that Treatcher, a skilled war medic, is willing to help Samuel remove the arrow from his leg that is slowly poisoning him. An uneasy sense of foreboding develops as it is revealed that Treatcher has far more sinister plans in store for Samuel who, Treatcher suspects, knows the whereabouts of a fortune in buried gold and Union bonds.

    After a purposely botched attempt to remove the arrow, Treatcher spends the evening tormenting Samuel with the promise of horrific torture come dawn if Samuel does not reveal the location of the hidden loot.

    As a new day approaches and Treatcher prepares to slowly murder Samuel, a surprise attack by two members of the pursuing war party leaves Treatcher horribly beaten and disfigured but able to escape the scene after managing to kill one of the attacking indians.

    With Samuel again hopeless and near death, the lone Yuma, MOON, charges the camp but has a sudden and dispiriting change of heart after observing Samuel in such wretched and defenseless condition.

    After suffering a horrific series of poison-induced visions and nightmares, Samuel awakens one morning to find himself alone in the camp with his leg mended and dressed and his fever broken. Samuel is again abandoned, vulnerable and without any prospects of survival in a hostile landscape.

    During an agonizing trek through the scorching desert, suffering the scourge of starvation and under constant pursuit from the revenge bent Treatcher, Samuel again comes face to face with Moon, who only days before had demonstrated the ultimate act of mercy and compassion by not only sparing Samuel’s life, but saving it too.

    For a brief moment, the two share something familiar but are nevertheless still separated by a vast gulf of incomprehension. Moon, the Indian wanderer, turns and once again leaves Samuel wavering in the unrelenting heat.

    Should Samuel choose to follow, there stands a chance for his survival. If he wishes to go his own way, a certain and agonizing death awaits in the clutches of cruel and merciless desert. Or even worse, at the hands of vile and murderous Treatcher.

    Samuel’s in a position very few get to be in. That choice is Samuel’s to make.


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    • This topic was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  JoeTaylor.
    12 Jul 2014 at 9:38 pm #5629

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    Link?


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    12 Jul 2014 at 9:58 pm #5630

    Glass
    Member
    13 Jul 2014 at 5:54 pm #5632

    efscerbo
    Member

    Damn, some of those shots are outrageously cool. I will definitely be interested in checking out the full film when it’s done. Good work, Joe!


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    14 Jul 2014 at 10:13 pm #5633

    Richard L.
    Member

    Wow. Very impressive. But I’ve got some questions.

    1st: I’m wondering if you got permission to use “Cormac McCarthy’s world of BLOOD MERIDIAN.” Based upon what I’ve heard from others, I’d say that his publishers have their lawyers guarding against any minor infringement, let alone an announced “based upon.”

    You can’t copyright history, of course, and Samuel Chamberlain’s work is fair game for all. Not so BLOOD MERIDIAN.

    2nd: Where did Chambers get that arrow? Not from the Delawares, I’d wager. For one thing, at this date they relied entirely on their guns for weaponry. I speak of the historical Delawares, not the fictional ones. The Yumas, of course, still used bows and arrows.

    3rd: If he “recently rode with the Glanton gang,” this can’t be a story about “the post Civil War American west.”


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    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  Richard L..
    15 Jul 2014 at 1:02 am #5635

    JoeTaylor
    Member

    Hello Richard,

    My mentioning McCarthy and Blood Meridian in the way that I have referenced him here is strictly for the synopsis. Once the film goes in production, “Blood Meridian” will never appear in an formal print. Poster art, DVD, Blue-Ray– anything commercial, I will in no way mention either name or title. I promise 🙂

    Since Glanton is never mentioned in the script or any name of historical reference, we don’t ever learn who Chamberlain was riding with. We just know that he and Treatcher we attacked at a ferry crossing and they rode with a band of scalp hunters. The “Crossing” is both literal and figurative in my story. In the script I do mention the Native American’s as “Yumas.” I see that in this synopsis I did mention Glanton, I wrote this thing years ago. But in later versions of the script John Glanton is never mentioned. And my story does take place just after Lincoln’s assassination. Sharp eyed students of history or those familiar with “Blood Meridan” will certainly recall those historical events and McCarthy’s writing. Read any review of “The Proposition” and look through some of the interviews with Nic Cave or the films director, and you will see McCarthy’s name and “Blood Meridian” mentioned numerous times. What I’ve done is really no different.

    In short he story is whole hearted inspired by McCarthy’s novel and the the circumstances obviously based on the raid at Yuma Crossing.


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    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  JoeTaylor.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  JoeTaylor.
    15 Jul 2014 at 1:56 am #5638

    Richard L.
    Member

    Mighty fine, Joe.

    You know, I always said that Chambers, the veteran, made his escape from the Delawares after they got back his horse and one of his guns; and that McCarthy meant Chambers as a nick-name for Samuel Chamberlain. I’m glad to see that at least one other person saw it the same way.

    Nicely done Judge-like villain in the trailer, and scenic shots John Ford would envy. Kind of amazing all in all.


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    15 Jul 2014 at 3:00 am #5639

    JoeTaylor
    Member

    Many thanks Richard. Your words mean a get deal and they’ve made me sort out details like these ever more.


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    22 Jul 2014 at 2:28 am #5673

    JoeTaylor
    Member

    Folks are reminding us to consider that James Franco’s “Blood Meridian” was filmed out of his pocket, so we which excuse the poor production values.

    Not to toot my horn, but my wallet is much thinner than Franco’s and my revisionist western “The Crossing” was also filmed for -$5.00 and I’m quit proud of what we managed to debut.


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