Twin Peaks

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  • 30 Aug 2017 at 3:00 pm #9776

    Driftwood70
    Member

    Hi all-

    I know we’re currently in the wake of a real hurricane…

    But thought I’d post Part 1 of my essay Hurricane Bob – Twin Peaks: The Return in the Year of Our Lord 2017. Out this week for the final week of Twin Peaks.

    http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/hurricane-bob-part-1/

    In Part 2, which will be out Friday, I briefly reference The Kekule Problem and Blood Meridian. Thought you might like to check it out.

    Cheers- and hope anyone down Houston way is alright.
    Jeff


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    30 Aug 2017 at 3:18 pm #9777

    m.f.f.8785
    Member

    Very interesting. A Science teacher at my school made his way into 3 episodes. We spent yesterday’s lunch trying to figure out what the Hell Lynch is doing with this re-boot.

    Mike


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    01 Sep 2017 at 7:21 am #9780

    Driftwood70
    Member

    Hurricane Bob Part 2 – The Black Star

    http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/hurricane-bob-part-2/#.Wak4DvDq9dw.twitter

    Discussion of Trinity with reference to the Kekule problem, and Blood Meridian.

    Cheers-
    Jeff


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    01 Sep 2017 at 5:36 pm #9781

    Richard L.
    Member

    Jeff – thanks for those links. Your writing is interesting. I liked the literary references and the listing of them, which sparked a memory, somehow.

    The Berlin Quarterly, which I perused, is indeed a worthy periodical, and in one of its issues, by chance or not, is an interview with the journalist, John Jeremiah Sullivan, whose first book I quoted in another thread here.

    Anyway, the memory sparked was of Sullivan’s interview by Michael Goetzman in the LA REVIEW OF BOOKS, published back in 2010 or 2011, but still on-line. Goetzman asked Sullivan to name the authors that most influenced him. Sullivan could have named the usual suspects such as David Foster Wallace and the others to whom he had already been compared. He seemed about to, then paused.

    Instead, while agreeing with Cormac McCarthy that books are made of books, he said he that stole left and right from other writers he had read, but that it was all unconscious. The thefts were everywhere, but to list them brought the unconscious to the conscious level, and that is not always a good thing. I’m paraphrasing and interpreting here, but here’s some quotes.

    “By using other books, mining other books, you’re adding to your palette. If you look at my first book, Blood Horses, it used pastiche to a certain extent: incorporating whole swatches of other texts without dicing them up. I’ve buried that a little bit in my work ever since, but it’s still the way my brain works.’

    “My pieces almost always begin with me in dialogue with something. They don’t begin ad ovo, you know, sitting at the blank white page and trying to think of a sentence. Something is already happening by the time I start writing; something that I’ve read that has set me off…so the more of that you can expose yourself to, the more pistons that are going to be firing.’

    [As for what authors have had the biggest influence on him], “I don’t know [pause], I feel like I’ve stolen from and reacted against almost every book I’ve ever read. . .a book will come into my life and my experience of it will totally obliterate any sense I have of a personal canon…’

    “…Your influences often get at you by tangent and subterfuge. It’s not always the books that you would like to have influenced you that do.’

    “When I was in college, Mark Richard wrote this piece about Tom Waits, this unbelievable profile for Esquire — best thing ever written about Tom Waits if you can ever find it, and I read that when I was 19 or 20, when I was in a hero-worship thrall, and I’m sure that had a massive influence on me and, I mean, look at what I ended up doing. But, bottom line, I’ve never thought about it because I don’t want to; your influences are a problem.”

    ——–

    I’m not sure why that came to me when I was reading your Twin Peaks piece, but it did. Maybe our unconscious minds can figure it out and give us an answer in the morning.


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    02 Sep 2017 at 3:24 am #9782

    Driftwood70
    Member

    Thanks for the comments, Richard. And thanks also for checking out the BQ. Happy you dig it.
    I will look up Sullivan…. Let me know if your unconscious has provided any answers this morning.


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    05 Sep 2017 at 3:49 pm #9787

    Candy Minx
    Member

    I haven’t been around for a while and what a treat to see this thread on TWIN PEAKS.

    This new season has just totally made my summer. Jeff, I am half-way through your first essay…and will read the second one later tonight. Stunning writing and I am so pleased to be able to dive deeper into any dialogue or reading about this series but most especially this season.

    I have a lot to say and I am working on my own response to the THE RETURN…but it’s not entirely formulated.

    My few immediate responses in short here are…as always….watching art made from someone who is enlightened and from a place of enlightenment and even with a character (or is it 2 or 3 characters that are enlightened in TP?) is EPIC. It is amazing.

    This version of enlightenment is so awesome.

    That the whole series is grappling with grief and loss is so emotional for me as it’s fan and viewer. On episode 17 I cried for almost the whole episode. I have two or three people in late stage cancer and my crying became a huge experience of how grief and love are almost the same thing. I can not explain it…but to watch a piece of work that understands the nature of reality I am almost breathless.

    David Lynch is a shaman.

    and also…how this could have been a whole retro nostalgic “we love Twin Peaks” thing…but somehow it is it’s own new object. It is not wallowing in fandom or nostalgia…although at some points it feels like it is fan-fiction but that makes it even better! Any sense of nostalgia is broken by horror.

    Watching TWIN PEAKS this summer has been like having a huge transplant of aesthetics into my being. I am already an insanely sensitive and prolific aesthetic person….but this has harnessed my true self.

    TWIN PEAKS is an object about how we have continued to destroy our environment that we not only have a bad relationship and PTSD and oppression from patriarchy but extended to how how we have a bad relationship with earth. This is our mother figure the log lady, the logging trucks with dead bodies…in a rain forest. And the crusty hobos who are like greasy Bob’s living in abandoned gas stations in the desert…and giving a mummification ceremony to “Evil Agent Cooper”.

    This has been a massive beautiful monster to watch. And it is created and filled with code for a secret audience to be initiated. I can’t wait to watch the whole season again.


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    05 Sep 2017 at 4:04 pm #9788

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Jeff, I just finished Part 1 of your essay. And I laughed because we both said shaman. I hadn’t got that far when I wrote a first impression here a few minutes ago…

    I love your writing and it’s intensity. I have a lot of respect for you comparing three pieces of art to the opening of TWIN PEAKS. Well done. You’ve taken a sharp knife to describing what you saw and I appreciate this in you.

    You also described the absolute pain of the original series finale…and Agent Cooper now…(I’m going to share on Facebook too because I have a bunch of pals watching the new season there)

    “Our own Commander-in-Chief-as-usurper notwithstanding, the agony of unresolved duality is no more apparent than in Lynch’s principle avatar Dale Cooper, or as we know him now, Dougie. The walking catatonia of Cooper-as-Dougie has been poured over elsewhere, nonetheless there’s a remarkable poignancy in Cooper’s predicament with regard to the events of the year – its day-by-day, minute-by-minute unfolding – that is worth mentioning again: it’s unbearable. His predicament is rather ours. While Cooper seems obliviously cocooned within the invisible confines of this idiot avatar, we squirm and wait and endure and pull our hair out and wait. His confines might be painless but ours are not. They are maddening. He is neither funny nor not funny; interesting nor uninteresting; neither crucial to the plot nor, as its would-be protagonist, unessential. We need him. We’ve needed him all along. We need him now more than ever, and his passivity is excruciating. The hero – the activated clarity – is impotent, absent. We cried out for Apollo and what we got was Forrest Gump. But the effect on the viewer, and on Lynch’s vital anti-plot, is brilliant. It couldn’t be more accurate to the zeitgeist, i.e. our immediate political, social and cultural reality. In other words: how long can it possibly go on like this? And who is going to fucking do something about it!? The limits of the narrative are the limits of our own. The fourth wall is demolished in real time, as we are. My greatest fear is that the Cooper we so desperately crave and require will emerge only in the final moments, when it is far too late. And yet this exact sort of profound and violent reversal in the final frames is precisely what made the series finale over 25 years ago so earth-shattering, upending the foundations of the entire Twin Peaks world in the inverted shards of a shattered mirror. The lone lighthouse on which we had become so reliant, the one we loved and the one who seemed to truly merit such universal admiration, was compromised, corrupted, extinguished. It was a heart-stopping turn of events striking at the true core of tragedy – that anyone, any place, may fall.”


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    05 Sep 2017 at 4:38 pm #9789

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Gee, Jeff, I just finished the second article. These are stunning, really. In fact I felt pretty verklempt reading, breaking down at one point. Good work.

    And you put into words so well…what I describe as enlightened art made by an enlightened artist ….with your words being so much clearer…We don’t have a lot of artists alive and enlightened out there…with work that is obviously overtly made to be experienced as transcendental. Lynch is one of the few. (can we identify others?)

    “It’s a spiritual riddle, or koan, solved as it is being crafted, and a glimpse of the intimate encounter between a master and his muse, as if it were unfolding in real time, before him, before his character, and before us – which, oddly, is exactly what is happening.”


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    05 Sep 2017 at 4:46 pm #9790

    Candy Minx
    Member

    Oh I followed one of your links…the VULTURe article about Lynch re-wiring our brains. Mos def. And that is why this has been the highlight of my summer. It’s like I’ve been having medicine of ayahuasca. I feel reinvigorated aesthetically…I feel like I’m a little giddy kid.

    This is what transformative and transcendental art does. I can’t imagine having any other profession than being an artist or in the arts. Art that can re-wire and reset our brains is the original trade of artists. And making such art keeps the artist honest. It keeps the artist resetting themselves as well as their community.

    (I say original purpose of the artist because when one is trapped within a totalitarian agriculture….one is likely to see art as a good way to make money disappear…as an investment, as a decoration, as pleasure…as something to capitalize upon)


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    06 Sep 2017 at 3:25 am #9791

    Driftwood70
    Member

    Hey Candy-
    Thanks so much for checking out these essays, and for all your comments and reflections. So happy you dug them. It certainly has been an insanely wild ride and, needless to say, there is so much endless material to dig into there in old Twin Peaks. It was a lot of fun to work out this very small attempt at a point of view on the whole TP universe with regard to the culture.

    (By the way, what was that other Vulture link you followed? I don’t think it was from me.)

    3:AM was extremely generous to publish 3 other essays of mine this past year, all about these contemporary modes of art as a requiem for the present. And I was really lucky to do an interview at the Rumpus this past week about the same themes. Thought you might get a kick out of it: http://therumpus.net/2017/09/the-rumpus-interview-with-jeff-wood/

    I think maybe like for many of us here, although my own conversation with these themes, began way before I’d ever had an encounter with Blood Meridian, that book and McCarthy’s work in general has come to occupy – like Lynch and Trinity – one of the central fulcrums of the ecstatic problems at the center of the culture. What a richness we have access to! It strikes me now that that, at least, is so life-affirming amid all the perhaps inevitable counter-movements and “drawing restraints.”


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