Who led the horses away from the volcano?

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Glass 5 years, 9 months ago.

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  • 01 Apr 2012 at 3:31 pm #595

    Glass
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    “At the foot of the mountain we drew lots and we sent two men to go on with the horses. I watched them go. One of them is at this fire tonight…” (Tobin BM 130-131)

    Noticed this the other night and wondered who these two were. Anyone have any ideas? A small point, I know. Curious if any more light is shed on this elsewhere in the book. And is BM a Middle Novel?


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    • This topic was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by  Glass.
    01 Apr 2012 at 4:30 pm #605

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    Re: Blood Meridian‘s being a middle novel….

    Such distinctions are, of course, arbitrary. But I figured it made more sense to lump it with The Border Trilogy than with Suttree, especially since so much is posted about it. It’ll give those other books, before and after the “middle period,” some room to breathe.


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    01 Apr 2012 at 6:38 pm #616

    Glass
    Member

    Marty, I see now how you divided the works. I wasn’t sure when I made the post. Thanks.


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    24 Apr 2012 at 8:01 pm #1021

    Glass
    Member

    Well, the volcano post didn’t ignite much interest, obviously. I’ll take another step into the igneous since the volcano is dead.

    Fire is still on my mind and I was wondering if the “fire in the lake” reference on p. 313 might have an ecological underpinning, namely if McCarthy might have been alluding to a catastrophic Venus Syndrome scenario, which is the theory that Venus’ oceans may have boiled away in a http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runaway_greenhouse_effect#section_7.

    The hint of boiling oceans, an anticipation of the catastrophic world afire in The Road.

    James Hansen offers this scary potential scenario in Storms of My Grandchildren:

    Would Earth proceed to the Venus syndrome, a runaway greenhouse effect that would destroy all life on the planet, perhaps permanently? While that is difficult to say based on present information, I’ve come to conclude that if we burn all reserves of oil, gas, and coal, there is a substantial chance we will initiate the runaway greenhouse. If we also burn the tar sands and tar shale, I believe the Venus syndrome is a dead certainty.

    If we can kill all the buffalo we surely can use up all the fossil fuels.


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