Writing Style of No Country

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Mike 2 years, 12 months ago.

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  • 18 Jan 2015 at 7:39 pm #6229

    jasonp
    Member

    How would you describe the writing style of No Country compared to his other novels? Cinematic?


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    23 Jan 2015 at 11:00 pm #6281

    shempenman
    Member

    You might know “the critic James Wood” refers to NCFOM as dirty realism, a genre from the 1980s used to collectively describe the group of writers of which Carver was one in a particular issue of Granta – the lit magazine.

    Dirty realism is a style that originates with Hemingway – whose own style (the focus on surface, the terse dialogue) probably had some influence on Hollywood movies – the talkies.


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    24 Jan 2015 at 6:50 am #6284

    jasonp
    Member

    That’s funny you say that because when I was reading it I sort of thought it was like reading a “Hemmingwayed-down” McCarthy.


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    24 Jan 2015 at 12:01 pm #6287

    Rick Wallach
    Keymaster

    I don’t know that you could call resembling Hemingway being “Hemingwayed down.” A few years ago the American Literature Association’s annual fiction symposium, in New Orleans, was devoted to McCarthy and Hemingway. Allen Josephs, one of the Hemingway Society’s movers and shakers and a big fan of both writers, had delivered a paper – on a panel also featuring the great H. R. Stoneback, arguably our greatest living Hemingway critic – the year before debunking the myth of the “short sentence” as a Hemingway “trademark,” and it set the stage for the following year’s more extended considerations of the many traits in common between the two authors.


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    27 Jan 2015 at 11:58 am #6309

    jasonp
    Member

    I’ve always thought of Hemingway and Faulkner as polar opposites but both brilliant in their own way.

    I’d have to re-read it to be sure but No Country’s prose style reminds me of The Old Man And The Sea. I could be totally off. It’s been a long time since I’ve picked up The Old Man And The Sea.
    Something about the way both novels smoothly and swiftly flow.


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    • This reply was modified 2 years, 12 months ago by  jasonp.
    27 Jan 2015 at 12:46 pm #6310

    jasonp
    Member

    By the way, when I said “Hemingwayed down,” I meant in the area of sparseness, not that McCarthy is the better of the two–although I do believe he is the better of the two.


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    27 Jan 2015 at 1:31 pm #6312

    Mike
    Member

    Rick,

    Are any of these Hemingway/McCarthy essays available anywhere?

    Mike


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